grubsludge:

redlipsrevolution:

hello-delicious-tea:

willgrahamsstagdo:

eggsuckinguttertrash:

anybody read this?
i didn’t pick it to read right now nah i totes had a change mind so yeah i am reading it, but some input would be kind of nice because, well, it seems a tad odd
the way it’s set up
it was mentioned quite a few times in my internet perusing, and a lot of people were talking about how long/hard (i’ve been reading for 7 months…) of a read it is so of course i had to buy it
and i mean, it’s a big book, gotta be at least 500 pages (i didn’t check) but
just
let me show you




















so yeah
any input you can give me on what i’m getting myself into here would be cool

This is the best book i have ever read, it took months to read it and i couldnt even finish it the second time round, i seriously recomend it though

This book is the bomb. It is awesome. It is terrifying. I haven’t yet had the leisure to just read the bloody thing start to finish, but it’s one of those books that you’re reading all haha this isn’t scary and then you look up and the walls are closing in around you and your hallway may or may not be there it might be stretching it might be shrinking it might be nice to close that door now. I went to the 7-11 to get a snack in the middle of reading this book. All the shelves had been rearranged. Nothing was where I left it. It scared the shit out of me, I had to take some very deep breaths here. And you would know why if you read this book, which could be catalogued as ‘architectural horror’.

This is my favorite book! Unlike everyone else on this, I was so addicted that I finished it in a week , but it was a tough read. I recommend taking your time and looking up questions you have. It’s totally worth the time to find translations, especially in pelafina’s notes. Also be on the lookout for similarities in different people’s stories. I find the whole thing super recursive.

this is the only book that made me shake and sweat while reading it lmao

YOOO GUESS WHO HAS THIS SITTING ON HER BOOKCASE RIGHT NOW 

grubsludge:

redlipsrevolution:

hello-delicious-tea:

willgrahamsstagdo:

eggsuckinguttertrash:

anybody read this?

i didn’t pick it to read right now nah i totes had a change mind so yeah i am reading it, but some input would be kind of nice because, well, it seems a tad odd

the way it’s set up

it was mentioned quite a few times in my internet perusing, and a lot of people were talking about how long/hard (i’ve been reading for 7 months…) of a read it is so of course i had to buy it

and i mean, it’s a big book, gotta be at least 500 pages (i didn’t check) but

just

let me show you

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so yeah

any input you can give me on what i’m getting myself into here would be cool

This is the best book i have ever read, it took months to read it and i couldnt even finish it the second time round, i seriously recomend it though

This book is the bomb. It is awesome. It is terrifying. I haven’t yet had the leisure to just read the bloody thing start to finish, but it’s one of those books that you’re reading all haha this isn’t scary and then you look up and the walls are closing in around you and your hallway may or may not be there it might be stretching it might be shrinking it might be nice to close that door now. I went to the 7-11 to get a snack in the middle of reading this book. All the shelves had been rearranged. Nothing was where I left it. It scared the shit out of me, I had to take some very deep breaths here. And you would know why if you read this book, which could be catalogued as ‘architectural horror’.

This is my favorite book! Unlike everyone else on this, I was so addicted that I finished it in a week , but it was a tough read. I recommend taking your time and looking up questions you have. It’s totally worth the time to find translations, especially in pelafina’s notes. Also be on the lookout for similarities in different people’s stories. I find the whole thing super recursive.

this is the only book that made me shake and sweat while reading it lmao

YOOO GUESS WHO HAS THIS SITTING ON HER BOOKCASE RIGHT NOW 

A message from therosebot
Hello! I'm sure you've said something about the inclusion of the character Wyborn in Coraline, but google is failing me. I'm writing a thesis on the topic of the physical manifestation of internal conflict when stories are told in a visual medium and am using the Coraline film, specifically Wyborn, as an example. So in short I'm asking you about the inclusion of Wyborn, if you had any say in the matter, and is he more than a storytelling device? (I apologize for my wordiness I'm in thesis mode)
A reply from neil-gaiman

I’d google “Wybie” rather than “Wyborn” (or, as it’s actually spelled, “Wybourne”). You’ll find many things like http://insidemovies.ew.com/2013/05/05/coraline-neil-gaiman-travis-knight-capetown-film-festival/ and http://www.tor.com/blogs/2013/10/gender-in-neil-gaiman-henry-selick-coraline

jasonshorrillustration:

Wild Thing!

Since doing my tribute piece for Maurice Sendak, I’ve decided to continue exploring one of my favorite books as a portfolio builder. Between the source material and the movie, there’s so much opportunity to play with the iconic creatures, their environment, as well as props. Expect lots of Wild Things related posts. 

"

Okay, okay, I’m going to tell you what Hermione sees in Ron.

A trio is a balancing act, right? They’re equalizers of each other. Harry’s like the action, Hermione’s the brains, Ron’s the heart. Hermione has been assassinated in these movies, and I mean that genuinely—by giving her every single positive character trait that Ron has, they have assassinated her character in the movies. She’s been harmed by being made to be less human, because everything good Ron has, she’s been given.

So, for instance: “If you want to kill Harry, you’re going to have to kill me too”—RON, leg is broken, he’s in pain, gets up and stands in front of Harry and says this. Who gets that line in the movie? Hermione.

“Fear of a name increases the fear of the thing itself.” Hermione doesn’t say Voldemort’s name until well into the books—that’s Dumbledore’s line. When does Hermione say it in the movies? Beginning of Movie 2.

When the Devil’s Snare is curling itself around everybody, Hermione panics, and Ron is the one who keeps his head and says “Are you a witch or not?” In the movie, everybody else panics and Hermione keeps her head and does the biggest, brightest flare of sunlight spell there ever was.

So, Hermione—all her flaws were shaved away in the films. And that sounds like you’re making a kick-ass, amazing character, and what you’re doing is dehumanizing her. And it pisses me off. It really does.

In the books, they balance each other out, because where Hermione gets frazzled and maybe her rationality overtakes some of her instinct, Ron has that to back it up; Ron has a kind of emotional grounding that can keep Hermione’s hyper-rationalness in check. Sometimes Hermione’s super-logical nature grates Harry and bothers him, and isn’t the thing he needs even if it’s the right thing, like when she says “You have a saving people thing.” That is the thing that Harry needed to hear, she’s a hundred percent right, but the way she does it is wrong. That’s the classic “she’s super logical, she’s super brilliant, but she doesn’t know how to handle people emotionally,” at least Harry.

So in the books they are this balanced group, and in the movies, in the movies—hell, not even Harry is good enough for Hermione in the movies. No one’s good enough for Hermione in the movies—God isn’t good enough for Hermione in the movies! Hermione is everybody’s everything in the movies.

Harry’s idea to jump on the dragon in the books, who gets it in the movies? Hermione, who hates to fly. Hermione, who overcomes her withering fear of flying to take over Harry’s big idea to get out of the—like, why does Hermione get all these moments?

[John: Because we need to market the movie to girls.]

I think girls like the books, period. And like the Hermione in the books, and like the Hermione in the books just fine before Hollywood made her idealized and perfect. And if they would have trusted that, they would have been just fine.

Would the movies have been bad if she was as awesome as she was in the books, and as human as she was in the books? Would the movies get worse?

She IS a strong girl character. This is the thing that pisses me off. They are equating “strong” with superhuman. To me, the Hermione in the book is twelve times stronger than the completely unreachable ideal of Hermione in the movies. Give me the Hermione in the book who’s human and has flaws any single day of the week.

Here’s a classic example: When Snape in the first book yells at Hermione for being an insufferable know-it-all, do you want to know what Ron says in the book? “Well, you’re asking the questions, and she has to answer. Why ask if you don’t want to be told?” What does he say in the movie? “He’s got a point, you know.” Ron? Would never do that. Would NEVER do that, even before he liked Hermione. Ron would never do that.

"
Melissa Anelli THROWS IT DOWN about the way Ron and Hermione have been adapted in the movies on the latest episode of PotterCast. Listen here. This glorious rant starts at about 49:00. (via karakamos)
fishingboatproceeds:

One of our last nights in Pittsburgh, we stayed up all night filming in this beautiful church. (Readers of the book will know the scene.) Around 4 in the morning, the crew had to set up for a new shot. Ansel and Nat sat down at the piano and began improvising together, a sad and beautiful song that filled the church. Shai and I were crying when we took these pictures, as was much of the movie’s crew. It is my most vivid memory of our wonderful time together filming the movie, and I’ve been thinking back to it a lot the past few days. The Fault in Our Stars movie was made by people who cared about the story and cared about each other. I’m so grateful to them, and to everyone who is now seeing the movie and responding to it so deeply. #tfios

fishingboatproceeds:

One of our last nights in Pittsburgh, we stayed up all night filming in this beautiful church. (Readers of the book will know the scene.) Around 4 in the morning, the crew had to set up for a new shot. Ansel and Nat sat down at the piano and began improvising together, a sad and beautiful song that filled the church. Shai and I were crying when we took these pictures, as was much of the movie’s crew. It is my most vivid memory of our wonderful time together filming the movie, and I’ve been thinking back to it a lot the past few days. The Fault in Our Stars movie was made by people who cared about the story and cared about each other. I’m so grateful to them, and to everyone who is now seeing the movie and responding to it so deeply. #tfios

shiyoonkim:

Hermione’s last minute study crunch before exams!

shiyoonkim:

Hermione’s last minute study crunch before exams!

MAY 4th, 1891 / Reichenbach Fall

wocinsolidarity:

Attanya: #WeNeedDiverseBooks because I love science fiction and fantasy books, but I’m tired of authors treating dragons and robots and magic as more plausible than black and brown characters

Jennifer: #WeNeedDiverseBooks because… when I was 13 a white girl told me it was selfishthat all of the protagonists in my stories were Latina because she “just can’t relate to nonwhite characters.” She made me feel guilty for writing about people like me. 

Aiesha: #WeNeedDiverseBooks because…Black Girls are more than sidekicks or “sassy, ghetto friend”

Facts and Figures About Race/Ethnicity in YA and Children’s Lit:

#WENEEDDIVERSEBOOKS

Posting this a little late, but followers please take the time out to check out this post explaining the #WeNeedDiverseBooks campaign and more events to come over the next few days! 

lumos5001:

ellaspirella:

This is the first time jo has directly answered a fans question via twitter. It also makes my Hufflepuff heart beat faster. 

lumos5001:

ellaspirella:

This is the first time jo has directly answered a fans question via twitter. It also makes my Hufflepuff heart beat faster. 

image

livesandliesofwizards:

The Muggle Studies classroom is always locked. In fact, there are few rooms in the castle with as much magical protection. There’s a special password needed to enter that’s distributed carefully to the year’s students on the first day of classes. They are sworn to secrecy and, to date, no one has broken that trust.
There’s more to this security than just fear of vandalism, though there has been that. Charity Burbage spent more than her fair share of time scrubbing nasty messages off her office door when she first started teaching. For a while it was a point of pride that she used her own effort to remove the hateful words. Then came the morning when she fell asleep next to a bucket of soapy water and was nearly late for her first lesson of the day. After that, she cast a Repelling Charm on her office and tried not to feel guilty about it.
The real reason for the layers of charms wrapped around the classroom is what goes on after hours.  If you were to stroll by on any given night. you may see a tearful first year or a stressed out fifth year or even a cool and confident prefect strolling up to the door.  You’d see them execute a complex set of wand patterns, whisper a word, and look around furtively before they enter. 
If you were to follow them in (and I would not suggest this, for the room has its own way of dealing with intruders), you’d see students of all Houses and years, talking and studying and reading. But you may miss what they have in common: they’re all Muggle born. This classroom is the after-hours refuge of those who feel as if they don’t belong, those who find themselves trapped between the magical and the mundane, their parents and their classmates. Here there are shelves of magazines whose covers don’t move; there are stacks of textbooks on science and math, heavy tomes of Shakespeare and thin volumes of poetry.
In the corner you may see Justin Finch-Fletchley studying for his A-levels. He had promised his mum that he would at least try for them, even if he wasn’t sure he would ever leave the magical world. Sometimes Hermione Granger joins him, and they teach each other calculus and world history and pore over the periodic table. 
By the fireplace you could find that tearful first year sitting with the calm prefect, their heads bent close. You might hear the first year pour out his heart, outline his fears, confess his insecurities. The prefect could respond in kind, admitting to the knot of confusion that lies underneath her placid exterior. They might then take out their wands and practice a spell, or pull out a child’s fairy tale collection and read aloud.
If you were a Muggle-born, this might be your sanctuary. It might be the place you miss most when you go home for the summer and try to fit your square peg into a world of round holes. It might be what you defend at the Battle of Hogwarts, fighting for your right to be confused and not fit in. It might be why you come back as the new Muggle Studies professor, why you create an after-hours class to help others get their A-levels and apply to university.
But then again, it might be just another classroom.
(written and submitted by the lovely ppyajunebug. There’s a tremendous sweetness to this that I find very appealing, something comforting about knowing that the Muggle-borns have their own space. This blog often explores the horrifying and strange, but sometimes it’s nice to consider good things, as well.)  

livesandliesofwizards:

The Muggle Studies classroom is always locked. In fact, there are few rooms in the castle with as much magical protection. There’s a special password needed to enter that’s distributed carefully to the year’s students on the first day of classes. They are sworn to secrecy and, to date, no one has broken that trust.

There’s more to this security than just fear of vandalism, though there has been that. Charity Burbage spent more than her fair share of time scrubbing nasty messages off her office door when she first started teaching. For a while it was a point of pride that she used her own effort to remove the hateful words. Then came the morning when she fell asleep next to a bucket of soapy water and was nearly late for her first lesson of the day. After that, she cast a Repelling Charm on her office and tried not to feel guilty about it.

The real reason for the layers of charms wrapped around the classroom is what goes on after hours.  If you were to stroll by on any given night. you may see a tearful first year or a stressed out fifth year or even a cool and confident prefect strolling up to the door.  You’d see them execute a complex set of wand patterns, whisper a word, and look around furtively before they enter. 

If you were to follow them in (and I would not suggest this, for the room has its own way of dealing with intruders), you’d see students of all Houses and years, talking and studying and reading. But you may miss what they have in common: they’re all Muggle born. This classroom is the after-hours refuge of those who feel as if they don’t belong, those who find themselves trapped between the magical and the mundane, their parents and their classmates. Here there are shelves of magazines whose covers don’t move; there are stacks of textbooks on science and math, heavy tomes of Shakespeare and thin volumes of poetry.

In the corner you may see Justin Finch-Fletchley studying for his A-levels. He had promised his mum that he would at least try for them, even if he wasn’t sure he would ever leave the magical world. Sometimes Hermione Granger joins him, and they teach each other calculus and world history and pore over the periodic table. 

By the fireplace you could find that tearful first year sitting with the calm prefect, their heads bent close. You might hear the first year pour out his heart, outline his fears, confess his insecurities. The prefect could respond in kind, admitting to the knot of confusion that lies underneath her placid exterior. They might then take out their wands and practice a spell, or pull out a child’s fairy tale collection and read aloud.

If you were a Muggle-born, this might be your sanctuary. It might be the place you miss most when you go home for the summer and try to fit your square peg into a world of round holes. It might be what you defend at the Battle of Hogwarts, fighting for your right to be confused and not fit in. It might be why you come back as the new Muggle Studies professor, why you create an after-hours class to help others get their A-levels and apply to university.

But then again, it might be just another classroom.

(written and submitted by the lovely ppyajunebug. There’s a tremendous sweetness to this that I find very appealing, something comforting about knowing that the Muggle-borns have their own space. This blog often explores the horrifying and strange, but sometimes it’s nice to consider good things, as well.)  

hunger games au: last year was child’s play

based on this post (x)

biohazardgirl:

singingtomysoul:

I have never read a John Green novel.

But I would care a lot more about critiques of him if any of the people I’ve seen shitting on him had actually read a John Green novel either.

Or pretty much anything that has ever come out of his mouth.

It’s really disgusting that people accuse John Green, a writer with clinical depression and anxiety to the point of it being very disabling at different times of his life, as someone who might romanticize and encourage teen suicide.

As an aside, I love his self awareness about his own writing. That shit is hard to do.

On the existence of his crash course videos alone, which provide free, accessible, consistent, intersectional, and quality higher level education to anyone with an internet connection (which is a fucking revolutionary concept and execution and should not be treated lightly) I am forever a fan of this man.

I’m still going through his books and his videos, and I’m still learning about him, but one thing that I can for sure tell you is that he is a very self-conscious writer and he actively strives to be a better human being and author. Which is so wonderful because he also encourages that in his viewers and his readers. He understands his position as not only a white, male author, but also as a person with a lot of power on the internet. And he does his best to use that power for other people. 

To think that he’s doing this in the face of external antagonism while dealing with the internal is just so heroic and amazing.

"Sophie, the girl, is given a spell and transformed into an old woman. It would be a lie to say that turning young again would mean living happily ever after. I didn’t want to say that. I didn’t want to make it seem like turning old was such a bad thing — the idea was that maybe she’ll have learned something by being old for a while, and, when she is actually old, make a better grandma. Anyway, as Sophie gets older, she gets more pep. And she says what’s on her mind. She is transformed from a shy, mousy little girl to a blunt, honest woman. It’s not a motif you see often, and, especially with an old woman taking up the whole screen, it’s a big theatrical risk. But it’s a delusion that being young means you’re happy."

Hayao Miyazaki, on what attracted him to Howl’s Moving Castle

The Auteur of Anime by Margaret Talbot: “The New Yorker” (January 17th, 2005) 

(via m-azing)

Slow down, and take a moment to either read the book, or wait until you watch a movie

It is a boy’s attempt to regain some control of his own life. It is a boy’s attempt to stare death in the face, and say, “No, it is my choice, and I will not light it.” He has come up with a way to say no, when his own body wasn’t able to say “no, stop” to the cancer that ravaged it.

Please don’t make any judgments on this book and movie until you have read it and until you have seen it. It’s not fair to fans, it’s not fair to the author, it’s not fair to the actors and even the crew. This is not a matter of having opinions. You are literally making judgments from what is basically a soundbite. If you are stalwart in not wanting a second opinion or an in depth explanation or conversation, then you are of course allowed to have your opinions. But do not tote them around and spew them everywhere with the intention of writing off this book and movie as something “pretentious,” and most of all, with the intention of hurting those who are emotionally invested in this book and movie. That is not cool, that is not nice, and that does not make you a better person.

Be cool, be nice, be open. Then we can talk.